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The “super” blue-moon will turn blood red before dawn. NASA’s got it covered with a live stream.

The total lunar eclipse early Wednesday morning will be a spectacularly rare one. Not only will the moon turn a deep-red color during the eclipse, but it will be slightly bigger and brighter than usual: a supermoon. But that’s not all: It’s the second full moon of January, making it a “blue moon” as well.

There’s just one problem: The total eclipse is not going to be visible for most of the East Coast of the United States. Instead, we’ll get a partial eclipse of the blue moon just before and during dawn.

The best time to look for it is at 6:48 am Eastern time. (Sunrise is at 7:15 am.) At that time, the moon will be near the horizon in the Western sky, so if you live in a wooded area, in a city, or anywhere with an obstructed view of the horizon, it will be hard to spot. By the time the total phase of the eclipse starts at 7:51 am, the moon will be completely out of view.

But no fear, East Coasters (and people in other regions of the world that won’t see a total eclipse), can still enjoy it thanks to NASA. Starting at 5:30 am Eastern time, the space agency will be broadcasting live coverage of the eclipse, which you can watch right here.

For people on the West Coast, where the view of the total eclipse should be good (as long as the weather’s clear), here’s a guide of when to look. The moon will be in the darkest part of the Earth’s shadow for more than an hour.

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