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Coincheck Faces Pressing Questions in the Wake of the World's Biggest Hack

It was, by any reckoning, a huge haul. Between $400 million and $534 million dollars of NEM stolen, depending on whether you go on its value at the time or once the market had reacted to the news. At a press conference on Friday afternoon, the stunned Coincheck team painted forlorn figures as they came to terms with being on the receiving end of the greatest heist of all time. In the inevitable post-mortem, questions have been raised about the security practices of the Japanese exchange.

Also read: Coincheck Halts Operations Amidst Hacking Rumors

Gox II: Goxxed Harder

Coincheck Faces Pressing Questions in the Wake of the World's Biggest HackJapan thought its days of being the focal point for record-breaking cryptocurrency heists were behind it. Less than four years on from the Mt Gox hack, which heralded the end of Japan’s and the world’s largest exchange, the country is back in the spotlight. Over the past few years, Japan has earned praise for its measured approach to cryptocurrencies, having encouraged their use in a regulated environment. Only this week, the Bank of Japan gave crypto a mild endorsement. But on Friday January 26, the nation’s 127 million citizens awoke to the news that another seismic cryptocurrency hack had occurred on home soil. At around 3am local time, someone withdrew all of the NEM held by the exchange in a single transaction.

The identity and origin of the hacker is unknown at this time, but what few details have emerged suggest serious flaws in Coincheck’s security procedures. It appears that the 500 million NEM were stored in a hot wallet with no multi-sig. If so, the exchange has learned nothing from recent history, for Read More Here